Overview of Morris's counters
Qrator

We are glad to present you an article written by Qrator Labs' engineer Dmitry Kamaldinov. If you want to be a part of our Core team, write us at hr@qrator.net.

1 Introduction

On implementing streaming algorithms, counting of events often occurs, where an event means something like a packet arrival or a connection establishment. Since the number of events is large, the available memory can become a bottleneck: an ordinary \(n\)-bit counter allows to take into account no more than \(2^n - 1\) events.
One way to handle a larger range of values using the same amount of memory would be approximate counting. This article provides an overview of the well-known Morris algorithm and some generalizations of it.

Another way to reduce the number of bits required for counting mass events is to use decay. We discuss such an approach here, and we are going to publish another blog post on this particular topic shortly.

In the beginning of this article, we analyse one straightforward probabilistic calculation algorithm and highlight its shortcomings (Section 2). Then (Section 3), we describe the algorithm proposed by Robert Morris in 1978 and indicate its most essential properties and advantages. For most non-trivial formulas and statements, the text contains our proofs, the demanding reader can find them in the inserts. In the following three sections, we outline valuable extensions of the classic algorithm: you can learn what Morris's counters and exponential decay have in common, how to improve the accuracy by sacrificing the maximum value, and how to handle weighted events efficiently.

Read more
Q1 2021 DDoS attacks and BGP incidents
Reports

The year 2021 started on such a high note for Qrator Labs: on January 19, our company celebrated its 10th anniversary. Shortly after, in February, our network mitigated quite an impressive 750 Gbps DDoS attack based on old and well known DNS amplification. Furthermore, there is a constant flow of BGP incidents; some are becoming global routing anomalies. We started reporting those in our newly made Twitter account for Qrator.Radar.

Nevertheless, with the first quarter of the year being over, we can take a closer look at DDoS attacks statistics and BGP incidents for January - March 2021. 

Read more
Qrator Labs' Value Partnership Programs
Qrator

Why is it valuable to get into the Qrator Labs partnership program?

In Qrator Labs, we firmly believe that working together brings a better result. Which is the reason why, for years, we were trying to find meaningful partnerships with all kinds of companies. They either seek to provide their existing customers with the top-notch DDoS mitigation technology developed at Qrator Labs with many additional ecosystem solutions or want to succeed the other way around. By getting their product available for Qrator Labs' customers by integrating into the Qrator anycast filtering network.

Read more
Addressing a particular internetworking misconception
Radar

BGP Route leaks vs BGP Hijacks

Since 2014 Qrator Labs has developed a BGP monitoring and analytics service called Qrator.Radar.  One of its main features is monitoring specific BGP anomalies that could result in an incident that we would further call either a BGP route leak or BGP hijack.

Both of them reroute traffic to third parties, compared to the no-anomaly state, but differently. Over the last few years, a lot of efforts have been invested in solving those issues, but there are still misunderstandings about what is what and how different tools are helping resolve different problems.

Read more
2020 Network Security and Availability Report
Reports

Read more
Cybersecurity Newsletter, February 14 - 28
Qrator Newsletter

Greetings, fellow newsletter subscriber! Once again, we are back with the best stories and articles published on the topic of cybersecurity in two weeks, between 14 and 28 February, the year 2021.

Read more
The day the whole world did not walk away
Radar

Yesterday, on February 19 Internet observed yet another demonstration of a handy Noction feature that is probably supposed to get you rich but is more likely to make you infamous.

Starting from 09:48 UTC, we saw around 200 thousand routes of previously non-existent prefixes with broken AS_PATH. But first things first.

The day started with a rather harsh and buzzing sound of email notifications for critical routing events, which, as you can see, are cut off on such a high threshold that we consider those to be global. 

Read more
Cybersecurity Newsletter, February 8 - 14
Qrator Newsletter

Hello and welcome back to the regular cyber and infosecurity letter! This time we are going through the relevant articles published 8 - 14 February 2021.

Read more
AS28548 - Cablevision - Route Leak
Radar

February 11, 2021 - AS28548 - Cablevision - leaked 2828 prefixes, creating 2828 conflicts for 763 ASNs in 80 countries. Maximum propagation: 93%. Severity: High.

Read more
Cybersecurity Newsletter, February 1 - 7
Qrator Newsletter

Greetings, fellow subscribers! As usual on Sundays, we are back with the most relevant and interesting articles published between February 1 and 7, 2021. 

Read more